I’ve just turned three type illustrations from my ‘How To Say It’ series into stretched canvas prints and made them available on Etsy.

my poster for Art Crank, titled First on the Trail

— The image depicts the journey of two cyclists through five unique landscapes including mesa, forest, alpine tundra, high alpine, and snowy peaks, all of which are familiar to Coloradans.

— As usual, I illustrated everything with sumi ink on watercolor paper before finishing the art in Photoshop. The three color screen-print measures 18x24” and was printed on French Banana Split paper in an edition of 50.

— The August 23 show at Ink Lounge in Denver had a great turn-out and this poster ended up completely selling out! If you didn’t make the show and would like to purchase one of these prints, I’ve made 15 available from Etsy.

I’ve remastered my Grand Budapest Hotel with a better repeat and also just put it up on Society6 for sale on several items.

CLICK HERE if you’d like to show your love for the movie in the form of a laptop or phone case, pillow, rug, duvet cover, or other stuff.

This is my contribution to the ‘Creatures of Extinction’ show at The Critter Shed on August 3rd 2014. The call for submissions asked for art based on the theme of extinction, and I immediately remembered these crazy drawings I did as a freshman in college. There are about six pages of ballpoint pen scribbles in my sketchbook titled ‘1-19-08 Extinct Species.’ Credit for this particularly childish burst of creativity was due to certain imagination enhancing substances.

1 > final art
2 > pencil sketch
3 > rough ink
4 > duralar separation
5 > final ink
6 > original creature drawings, circa 2008

Based on the positive response of my Grand Budapest Hotel pattern, I’ve decided to continue with the back catalog of Wes Anderson films. I will do them in reverse chronological order, so Moonrise Kingdom is next.
Here’s a peek into my sketchbook, and the process I use to create the assets for the pattern. There are some tactical decisions such as separating the tires from the bike (visible from frame 4 to 5). You can also see how some ideas are altered or entirely nixed along the way (air-siren replaced by fishing net).
People usually wonder how long things like this take, so I am keeping track of my hours as I go. So far I’ve spent just over 10 hours, including watching the movie.

Based on the positive response of my Grand Budapest Hotel pattern, I’ve decided to continue with the back catalog of Wes Anderson films. I will do them in reverse chronological order, so Moonrise Kingdom is next.

Here’s a peek into my sketchbook, and the process I use to create the assets for the pattern. There are some tactical decisions such as separating the tires from the bike (visible from frame 4 to 5). You can also see how some ideas are altered or entirely nixed along the way (air-siren replaced by fishing net).

People usually wonder how long things like this take, so I am keeping track of my hours as I go. So far I’ve spent just over 10 hours, including watching the movie.

the first illustration in a new series featuring endearing moments from everyday life in Boulder, Colorado

I am currently working on series of labels for a line of cafe syrups. This is the custom alphabet I created for the project.

I am currently working on series of labels for a line of cafe syrups. This is the custom alphabet I created for the project.

 Budapest Hotel Pattern 

1-3 > artwork detail
4 > original artwork: the entire pattern was created from this spread
5 > full pattern, with just one horizontal repeat (each base unit of the pattern contains four variants of each image)
6 > color palette, derived from characters and scenes

This pattern was created solely from memory after I saw the film. I have found that when I don’t use source images for illustrations they tend to be more imaginative, which seemed fitting for the theatrical nature of this story.

If you look closely at the full pattern, you will find several interesting variations of the images which allowed me to weave parts of the narrative into the art itself.

Dan Lehman | freelance designer and illustrator | Boulder CO